Maryann E. Martone

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Maryann E. Martone
Affiliation: University of California, San Diego
Location: United States of America
Position:
Interest(s):
Databases: Neurotree Twitter (memartone)
Link(s): http://neurosciences.ucsd.edu/faculty/Pages/maryann-martone.aspx
http://frontiersin.org/neuroscience/profiles/maryannemartone/
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Maryann E. Martone is Professor-in-Residence in the Department of Neurosciences and Co-Director of the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR) at the University of California, San Diego.

She is involved in the Neuroscience Information Framework and the semantic wiki NeuroLex, and is a member of the governing board of the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility.

[edit] Papers

  1. A cell-centered database for electron tomographic data
  2. Database resources for cellular electron microscopy
  3. E-neuroscience: challenges and triumphs in integrating distributed data from molecules to brains
  4. The cell-centered database: a database for multiscale structural and protein localization data from light and electron microscopy
  5. The cell centered database project: an update on building community resources for managing and sharing 3D imaging data
  6. The Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF): a neuroscience-centered portal for searching and accessing diverse resources

[edit] As co-authors

  1. Application of neuroanatomical ontologies for neuroimaging data annotation
  2. Federated access to heterogeneous information resources in the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF)
  3. NeuroLex.org - a semantic wiki for neuroinformatics based on the NIF Standard Ontology
  4. NeuroLex.org: an online framework for neuroscience knowledge
  5. Ontologies for neuroscience: what are they and what are they good for?
  6. The Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resources Clearinghouse (NITRC)
  7. The NIFSTD and BIRNLex vocabularies: building comprehensive ontologies for neuroscience
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