Networks and language in the 2010 election

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Conference paper (help)
Networks and language in the 2010 election
Authors: Avishay Livne, Matthews P. Simmons, W. Abraham Gong, Eytan Adar, Lada A. Adamic
Citation: missing booktitle in Conference Proceedings at OpenSIUC : 15. 2011
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Meeting: 4th Annual Political Networks Conference
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Link(s): http://opensiuc.lib.siu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1015&context=pnconfs_2011
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Networks and language in the 2010 election describes a text mining and network analysis of Twitter data generated by United States House, Senate and gubernatorial candidates for the midterm (2010) election.

The analysis also included text sentiment analysis.

The paper is very similar to The party is over here: structure and content in the 2010 election and seems to present the same results.


Contents

[edit] Data

The Twitter data consisted of 460'038 tweets from 2007 to 2010 from 687 candidates. 339 democrats and 348 republicans (including 95 identified as Tea Party candidates).

The Twitter network between the candidate was also crawled. 4'429 edges between candidates were found.

The researchers also downloaded the candidate homepages as well as web pages linked from the tweets. The found 132'376 distinct web pages.

[edit] Methods

[edit] Results

The paper presently states "Please do not quote from or cite this paper without the authors' permission". However, The party is over here: structure and content in the 2010 election seems not to have such reservations.

[edit] Related papers

  1. Automatic detection of political opinions in tweets
  2. The party is over here: structure and content in the 2010 election
  3. The political blogosphere and the 2004 U.S. election: divided they blog
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