Reconstructing speech from human auditory cortex

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Reconstructing speech from human auditory cortex
Authors: Brian N. Pasley, Stephen V. David, Nima Mesgarani, Adeen Flinker, Shihab A. Shamma, Nathan E. Crone, Robert T. Knight, Edward F. Chang
Citation: PLoS Biology 10 (1): e1001251. 2012 January
Database(s): Google Scholar cites PubMed (PMID/22303281)
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001251.
PMCID:3269422
Link(s): http://knightlab.berkeley.edu/statics/publications/2012/02/22/journal.pbio.1001251.pdf
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Reconstructing speech from human auditory cortex describes a electrocorticographic study with 15 patients undergoing neurosurgery, that were subjected to speech stimuli.

Contents

[edit] Stimuli

Stimuli was isolated words included nouns, verbs, proper names, and pseudowords and sentences.

Sentences was from Texas Instruments/Massachusetts Institute of Technology (TIMIT) database

[edit] Subjects

Subject group #1 (help)
Patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures
Subjects/♂/♀: 15 /  /
Age: (–)
Nationality: United States of America
Approval: Johns Hopkins Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, University of California, San Francisco and Berkeley Institutional Review Boards and Committees on Human Research
Databases:

Group 1 of 15 patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures were included in the study.

The study on the human subjects was approved by the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, University of California, San Francisco and Berkeley Institutional Review Boards and Committees on Human Research.

[edit] Data

Electrocorticographic grid placed over left or right frontotemporal regions with a sampleing rate of 1000, 2'003 or 3'052 hz.

Processing:

  1. "Removal of channels with artifacts or excessive noise"
  2. Extraction of high gamma band power (70-150 Hz) with Hilbert-Huang transform.[1]
  3. Conversion to standardized z-scores.

[edit] Related papers

  1. A continuous semantic space describes the representation of thousands of object and action categories across the human brain
  2. Neural coding of continuous speech in auditory cortex during monaural and dichotic listening

[edit] References

  1. Temporal envelope of time-compressed speech represented in the human auditory cortex
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