The QWERTY effect: how typing shapes the meanings of words

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The QWERTY effect: how typing shapes the meanings of words
Authors: Kyle Jasmin, Daniel Casasanto
Citation: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 19 (3): 499-504. 2012 June
Database(s): PubMed (PMID/22391999)
DOI: 10.3758/s13423-012-0229-7.
PMCID:3348452
Link(s): http://www.springerlink.com/content/y22087242663u647/fulltext.pdf
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The QWERTY effect: how typing shapes the meanings of words is a study on the emotional valence of words and their correlation with the position of letters of the words on a QWERTY keyboard.

The authors conclude that words with letters on the right side of the keyboard, it is argued, are more positive.

Contents

[edit] Data

The following word lists were used for the two first experiments:

  • ANEW-family
    • ANEW
    • SPANEW, Spanish ANEW[1]
    • DANEW, Dutch ANEW
  • AFINN

[edit] Related papers

  1. Temporal patterns of happiness and information in a global social network: hedonometrics and Twitter

[edit] External links

  1. The QWERTY Effect: How Typing May Shape the Meaning of Words, Wired.
  2. Mark Liberman, The QWERTY effect
  3. Mark Liberman, Language Log
  4. Daniel Casasanto and Kyle Jasmin, The Robustness of the QWERTY Effect
  5. kamdh (probably Kameron Decker Harris, Does QWERTY Affect Happiness? 2012-03-19.
  6. Response to Jasmin and Casasanto's reponse to me

[edit] Criticism

  1. Why is 'v' not among the left-sided letters, but left out?
  2. Why is 'y' and 'b' necessarily left/right sided?

[edit] References

  1. The Spanish adaptation of ANEW (affective norms for English words)
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